Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Appendix 1: Spatial alignment

To ensure alignment with the cadastre, meshblocks should, where possible, adhere to:

  • cadastral boundaries, for example parcel boundaries, easement boundaries, meridional circuit boundaries, road corridors, surveyed definitions of topographic and hydrographic boundaries
    (Note: The meridional circuit was established in the late 1870s. Covering all of New Zealand, each circuit was a block of land with a primary station, whose location was carefully established by astronomical observations. The station formed the basis of the triangulation networks which followed.)
  • connective or projected boundaries (eg bearings and coordinates expressed in Lat Long, NZMG, NZTM), feature to feature (eg trig to trig, peak to peak, parcel corner to road intersection), feature to intersect (eg projection from parcel boundary to intersection with road centreline), lines across river mouths, harbours, or bays (where well defined, eg cadastral intersection to intersection)
  • offset boundaries, for example outer boundary of Territorial Sea and EEZ, centrelines of surveyed road and railway corridors, streams, parcels, centrelines of physical road and railway formations, streams, parcels, road frontages
  • inclusive boundaries (where the general shape and location is graphically defined but no absolute precision exists), for example boxes or lassos drawn around rocks or island groups, lines fencing off areas of water between the coastline and the outer limit of the Territorial Sea, lines across river mouths, harbours, bays (where approximated)
  • topographic and hydrographic boundaries, for example streams, rivers, lakes, coastline definitions (such as mean high water mark, mean low water mark), ridgelines, river banks, islands, bush lines, real time definitions (moves with feature), historic definitions (as it existed at a certain point in time, latest definition always applies), surveyed definitions (as defined by survey at a certain point in time)
  • constructed features, for example road centrelines, railway centrelines, dams, groynes, building complexes, fence lines
  • current and historic boundaries – at times boundaries are maintained in relative alignment, in accordance with the historic location of features such as former streambeds, former cadastral boundaries, and the former location of a road
  • jurisdictional boundaries (based on a combination of the above, but with an additional status in that the intent of the meshblock line is to follow the boundary, rather than the features that the boundary follows), for example wards, territorial authorities, regions, electoral boundaries, jury districts.
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+